Free Pay Per Click (PPC) Advertising Credits Worth Over $500

Free Pay Per Click (PPC) Advertising Credits

Pay Per Click advertising (or simply PPC Advertising) is an Internet Marketing model where advertisers pay only when their advertisement is clicked.

The most popular Pay Per Click advertising networks are Google AdWords, Bing Ads (formerly Microsoft adCenter and MSN adCenter), Yahoo Search Marketing, and Facebook Ads.

What’s interesting about the pay-per-click advertising model is that there’s no minimum spending requirement. For instance, you can set a daily budget of $5 and maximum cost per click (CPC) as 5 cents. And you pay only when someone clicks on your ad. It’s that simple!

Free Pay-Per-Click Advertising Credits

Start your Search Engine Marketing campaigns with free credits. Most of the pay-per-click advertising networks (Google AdWords, Yahoo Search Marketing, Microsoft adCenter, Facebook, Ask.com, BidVertiser, Miva, etc.) offer free ad credits to attract new customers. So here are the various PPC networks and their available free ad credits. Sign up today!

Bing Ads Coupon

Bing Ads

Bing Ads is now offering higher credits to attract more advertisers. The promotional credit depends upon your location and is different for different countries. Bing ad credit for the United States and Canada is $50, for UK it’s £50, for France, Germany, Italy and Spain it’s €50, for India it’s Rs. 1,000, for New Zealand it’s $40 NZD, for Australia it’s $40 AUD, and for Brazil it’s R$60. Moreover, your address, currency, and the coupon code should match (e.g. U.K. address, GBP currency; UK coupon).

Bing Ads Coupon (USA)

Bing Ads Canada Coupon

Bing Ads UK Coupon

Bing Ads France Coupon

Bing Ads Germany Coupon

Bing Ads Italy Coupon

Bing Ads Spain Coupon

Bing Ads India Coupon

Bing Ads Australia Coupon

Bing Ads New Zealand Coupon

Bing Ads Brazil Coupon

Yahoo Search Marketing Coupon

Yahoo Bing Network

As you probably know, Microsoft & Yahoo! formed the Yahoo Bing Network. So all you need is a Bing Ads account to advertise on the Yahoo Bing Network (an advertising marketplace made up of Yahoo, Bing, and their partner websites). But if your monthly budget is above $1,000 then you can sign up here and a Yahoo sales representative will contact you.

The Yahoo Bing Network is the combined advertising marketplace made up of Yahoo, Bing, and syndicated partner sites such as Facebook, Amazon, Monster, WebMD, CNBC, and Viacom, plus networks like The Wall Street Journal Digital Network.

Google AdWords Coupon

Google AdWords

Google AdWords now requires you to accrue advertising charges $5–50 (depending upon the voucher) in order to get free ad credits. You have to request your code by filling out a form and they will email you the offer code.

Note: If the above AdWords links didn’t work for you or you haven’t received the coupon code by e-mail and you never opened an account before (an existing AdWords customer is not eligible for a promotional credit unless they invite you) or never redeemed a coupon before then you can call their support center and they will give you $100 credit (based on your location) to try AdWords.

BidVertiser Coupon

Facebook Ads Coupon

Note: If you run a digital marketing agency or is managing client accounts then join Facebook Small Business Agency Program and earn Facebook ad coupons worth up to $500 or 10% of your client’s ad spend, whichever is smaller.

Amazon Product Ads

LookSmart Ads

  • Free Credits: $50
  • Initial Deposit: $50
  • Promo Code: 50LS
  • Sign Up URL: LookSmart Ads

Perfect Audience Retargeting Ads

Read: Kickstart Your First Perfect Audience Retargeting Campaign In 5 Steps

Advertise.com

  • Free Credits: 10% of your deposit (up to $1,000)
  • Initial Deposit: $1,000
  • Promo Code: N/A
  • Sign Up URL: Advertise.com

Last Updated: March, 2015

How Does Google Make Money?

Google

If there are three companies that are dominating the technology space, they are — Apple, Microsoft, and Google. And you know how Apple and Microsoft makes money. But, do you know how Google makes money?

Sixty billion dollars ($60 bn). Guess what? That was the annual revenue (and it was $37 billion when I first published this blog post back in 2012) of the world’s largest search engine, Google, in 2014.

But how is that really possible when they hardly have any tangible products or when they don’t charge a penny for most of their products and services?

Don’t Miss: Over 151 Google Products & Services You Probably Don’t Know

Well, it’s advertising, and again advertising. Google’s majority revenue comes from two advertising platforms — Google AdWords and Google AdSense. In fact, 96% of Google’s revenue is from advertising.

Recently, I came across this interesting thread on Quora.com where Oliver Emberton answered the question “If I want to become an entrepreneur, where do I start?“.

Oliver answers:

Think of a company as a machine you design and build. Your ‘machine’ always has certain parts. It sells something to someone, and re-invests some of that to help make more sales in future. What’s left over is profit for the owners.

And then he cited Google as a money machine and summarizes everything as an infographic:

Google_Money_Machine

So, How Does Google Make Money?

In Google’s own words…

Today, the majority of our revenue comes from advertising.

Advertisers are increasingly turning to the Internet to market their products and services. Google AdWords, our auction-based advertising program, enables advertisers to deliver relevant ads targeted to search queries or web content to potential customers across Google sites and through the Google Network, which consists of content owners and websites.

Our proprietary technology automatically matches ads to the content of the page on which they appear, and advertisers pay us either when a user clicks on one of its ads or based on the number of times their ads appear on the Google Network.

We distribute our advertisers’ AdWords ads for display on the Google Network through our AdSense program. We share most of the revenue generated from ads shown on a site of a Google Network member with that member.

Source: Google Investor Relations

But Wait, We Don’t See Any Ads On Google

Google’s homepage is clean with no content or ads or popup (here’s why). And what’s interesting is that, almost all Google products and services that we use are absolutely free — whether it’s Search, Gmail, YouTube, Drive, Docs, Picasa, Maps, Earth, News, Analytics, Blogger.com or their Mobile Apps.

Then how do they make big bucks? It’s all about advertising.

Google has a very popular auction based advertising program called — Google AdWords. With Google AdWords, you can advertise your business on Google’s search result pages. That’s where most of the revenue comes from.

Google Ads

If you have noticed Google’s search results when you perform any of your web searches then you can see “Ads” across search result pages.

These ads are obviously sponsored by advertisers on Google AdWords who pays Google every time you click any of those ads. So, if you search for “loans” or say “insurance” on Google then you’ll  find ads relevant to “loans” or “insurance” itself.

For instance, you can search a commercial keyword like “buy insurance” on Google.com to see ads related to “insurance“.

Google’s Search Results Page — "Buy Insurance"

That’s not all! Google also has a publisher program called Google AdSense and it allows over a million publishers like me (and probably you) to make money by displaying relevant ads on our websites or blogs.

When it comes to website monetization, Google AdSense is every webmaster’s choice. Thanks to their huge ad inventory.

Read: Bing Ads vs. Google AdWords

And It’s Really A Win-Win-Win Advertising Model

Google’s advertising model is revolutionary and its essence lies in Google’s innovation. Google makes money from their advertisers and the advertiser pays only for performance (that is, only when someone clicks on their ad).

This is contrary to traditional banner advertising where advertisers are required to pay whenever their ad is displayed on a banner network.

And the consumer who is searching for something on Google sees only ads related to what he is searching. So, it is this advertising  model that creates a win-win-win situation for Google, Advertisers, and the Consumers.

Now, How Much Are Advertisers Paying Per Click

The price an advertiser pays for a click (known as Cost Per Click or simply CPC) usually depends on a lot of factors. Google is using a kind of bidding system. You select the keywords for which you want to show ads so that when someone searches for those keywords on Google, your ads will be shown.

Let’s say you own an insurance company and want to find customers. What you do is bid on keywords related to “Insurance” like “buy insurance”, “life insurance” etc. So, whenever a user searches for “buy insurance” or “life insurance” on Google.com (or their partner network like AOL.com) your ads will be shown.

The price you need to pay Google depends on the competition for that particular keyword(s). Now, if there are several other advertisers bidding for the same keyword then most probably you will have to outbid them to show your ad on top.

The Cost Per Click (CPC) varies from $0.01 to $100 (or maybe even more). For example, advertisers are willing to pay as high as $54 per click for insurance, mortgages, and loans related keywords.

Wait, Google has even more money making machines!

Google’s Mobile Strategy

We all have seen how the smartphone market exploded over the past few years. And the result? The mobile search market is also growing and soon mobile devices will be the primary way of accessing the web.

That’s why most of the Google products are designed for mobile users as well (Google’s 2013 mobile revenues were around $8 bn).

WordStream created an infographic that shows some real insights about Google’s mobile strategy. And it focuses four key areas: Mobile Advertising, Mobile Apps, Mobile Content, and Mobile Devices.

Mobile Advertising

Google’s mobile advertising is powered by AdWords itself and it makes Google money when people click ads on Google from their mobile devices. That’s not all! Google also has a mobile advertising platform, called AdMob, which is designed for mobile apps.

You see a lot of ads within several apps when you use different mobile apps, right? If so, then there is a good chance that it’s powered by Google’s AdMob.

Mobile Apps

Whether it’s Android or iOS or Windows Phone, some of the most popular mobile apps belongs to Google. They’re all free but it further accelerates Google’s mobile advertising revenue.

Mobile Content

Google’s mobile content is powered by YouTube (world’s largest video sharing website) and Google Play (a marketplace for apps, ebooks, music, etc. for mobile devices). Google makes money from YouTube by selling text, image, video ads, and also from subscriptions.

Google Play is a digital distribution platform where they charge developers and publishers for hosting and marketing their products.

Mobile Devices

With the acquisition of Android and Motorola, Google entered the devices space and now they are selling a wide range of mobile devices and gadgets like phones, tablets, wearable devices, etc.

Read: Gmail vs. Outlook.com vs. Yahoo! Mail: An Ultimate Comparison

What About Apple & Microsoft?

When it comes to Apple or Microsoft we all know how they make money. Apple makes most of its money selling iPhones and iPads. In fact, iPhone and iPad sales accounts for over 70% of Apple’s revenue.

Apple Revenue Breakdown

And Microsoft’s revenue primarily comes from their two flagship products — Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office. As you can see from the following chart, Windows & Office sales (marked as Commercial & Consumer Licensing) accounts for over 60% of Microsoft’s revenue.

Microsoft Revenue Breakdown

Chart Illustration: ZDNet

Read: OneDrive vs. Dropbox vs. Google Drive vs. Amazon Cloud Drive vs. iCloud

BONUS: How Google Search Works

Now that you know how Google make so much money when they are offering most of their services for free. But have you ever wondered how Google search works?

A few years back Google released an interactive infographic that shows “How Search Works” (Tip: You can also hover your cursor (or can click on it) over certain image elements to learn more about it.).

It explains “Google Search” in a graphical way and also explores the major search features and algorithms (for example, how they fight spam).

The infographic is divided into three parts and it starts by saying how Google creates “The Index”. That is, Google navigates the web (made up of 60 trillion web pages and counting) by crawling from one web page to another by following links.

And it keeps a copy of each unique web page that it finds to make it searchable and it’s collectively called “The Google Index” (It’s over 100 million gigabytes in size).

The next part is about how Google uses its search algorithms (that is, computer programs and formulas) to find the web pages that you are looking for — in order to deliver the best results possible.

And the last part is about how Google fights spam. Google says the majority of spam removal is automatic (that is, it uses algorithms to filter out spam from its search result pages) but they also take manual actions against questionable websites.

They also give you a chance to take a look at the web pages that were removed from the Google Index few hours back as live spam screenshots.

Conclusion

Even after so many acquisitions and business diversification, over 90% of Google’s revenue still comes from advertising.

Again, 70% of this ad revenue is from Google AdWords (that is, Google owned web properties like Google.com, YouTube.com, etc.) and 30% from Google AdSense (partner networks and websites).

Now you know that the biggest search engine is also the biggest advertising company in the world. :)

First Published: March 25, 2012; Last Updated: Monday, December 1, 2014

Google AdWords Advertising Policies: What You Need To Know

Google AdWords

When I wrote the blogpost “How To Make Money Online With AdWords Without A Website” I got few comments and emails about whether Google AdWords allows direct linking.

That is, are we allowed to link directly to advertisers (using our affiliate URLs) from Google AdWords ads? In a word, Yes! But wait, they do have some advertising policies that every advertisers are supposed to follow.

[Read more…]

Perfect Audience Review: Kickstart Your First Retargeting Campaign In 5 Steps

You visit a shopping website and soon its ads are everywhere you go — on your favorite blog, on news portal, and even on your Facebook. No, it isn’t magic. They’re all retargeted ads. Today, retargeted ads are so popular that it’s everywhere on the web — on Facebook, on Twitter, and even on your favorite blogs and websites.

Retargeting: What Is It? And Why Retarget?

Retargeting (also known as Remarketing) is a form of online advertising in which you’re targeting users who previously visited your website (but is visiting other websites), and left without taking an action.

Why should you retarget users? The reason is… less than 5% of the first time visitors convert to customers. If you have an e-Commerce website and you used a pay-per-click campaign to attract targeted users, then it’s more likely that they will leave your website without buying or signing up.

The bounced visitors may come back to your website once again or maybe they won’t. So you can target those users once again by showing retargeted ads and that makes it easier for them to find you. [Read more…]

Bing Ads vs. Google AdWords: 10 Features Unique To Bing Ads

Bing Ads vs. Google AdWords

If you’re a search engine marketer and if someone asks you to name two search engines, it’s more likely that you mention Google and Bing (or maybe Yahoo), right? Of course there are other search engines like Baidu, Yandex, Blekko, DuckDuckGo, etc. but Google and Bing are the two real search engines that matter the most to advertisers. Why? Because Google and Bing (Microsoft & Yahoo) have a combined market share of over 90% in the U.S. search market according to comScore.

Google vs. Yahoo Bing Network: Search Market Share

Google has a search market share of 67.5% in the U.S. and the combined market share of the Yahoo Bing network is around 30% as of March, 2014. So it means that when you advertise on Google AdWords and Bing Ads you’re already reaching 90% of searchers. If you’re not promoting your business on Bing then it’s like you’re ignoring a large population as 1/3rd of all searches takes places on non-Google websites.

[Read more…]

Free Google AdWords Coupon Code 2013 – Worth Up To $100

Google AdWords

Google AdWords Key Highlights

  • AdWords is super effective for all businesses.
  • Demographics and locations can be chosen by advertisers before showing ads.
  • Campaigns can be modified, stopped or paused anytime.
  • With the CPC pricing, advertisers need to pay only when the ads are clicked on by prospective clients.
  • Tracking of expenditure and performance of ads and the campaigns is easy.
  • Advertisers can keep a check on the budget for an ad or campaign and control it regularly.
  • There is no minimum budget for a campaign and hence it is pocket friendly.

Free Google AdWords Voucher Code Worth $100

As you might have already noticed, Google AdWords changed the way coupons work and now advertisers are required to accrue initial advertising charges ($5 to $50) within 31 days of entering the coupon code that you have received. Also, you must redeem the coupon code before its expiry date.

You’ll be charged when you exceed the promotional credit but you’re free to suspend your ads anytime before the credit is exhausted. AdWords won’t notify you the status of your promotional credits so you need to monitor your campaigns regularly to make sure that you haven’t exceeded the free ad credits.

Free Google AdWords Promotional Code

When you get the coupon code you can login to your AdWords account (or create a new account if you’re a new advertiser) and navigate to Billing to enter your promo code.

If the above links didn’t work for you or you haven’t received the coupon code by e-mail and you never opened an account before (an existing AdWords customer is not eligible for a promotional credit unless they invite you) or never redeemed a coupon before then you can call their support center and they’ll give you $100 credit (based on your location) to try AdWords.

Recommended

And Wait… Here’s How To Find AdWords Coupons By Yourself

If you know how to use Google’s site search effectively then you can find AdWords coupons by yourself. It is possible because most of the AdWords’ landing pages that offer free advertising credit are indexed by Google. So you can search “free advertising credit”, “free $100 credit”, etc. on Google using the following format: https://www.google.com/search?q=site:www.google.com+free+advertising+credit.

You’ll see a list of AdWords offer pages that says free ad credits but make sure that you’re signing up only after getting the coupon code. But yeah, you can even apply the coupon code after the sign up process because as long as you never applied a promotional code to your account your account is eligible.

And that’s not all, you can enter multiple coupons in a single AdWords account as you go. But don’t think about abusing the system as it doesn’t work that way. You sign up for a new account, accrue the initial spending requirements,  and then apply the first promotional code that you have received. When your coupon code is fully redeemed and if you continue to promote your business on AdWords as a paying advertiser then you can apply another promotional code after 3 months or so (depending upon the new offer code). And don’t think about opening multiple AdWords account only to redeem promotional codes. Because they will suspend all your accounts and may even black list you so that you won’t be able to open a new account.

Sometimes even if you don’t become a paid advertiser, Google may e-mail you new promotional credit in order to bring you back to AdWords. It usually happens when your AdWords account is inactive for several months.

Affiliate Marketers: How To Tweak Your Pay Per Click Ad Campaigns

Free-Pay-Per-Click-Advertising-Credits

If you’re an advertiser on Google AdWords, Bing Ads, or any other pay-per-click advertising network then you know that you can target users by location and also by the devices that they’re using. For example, you can show your ads to users who live in the U.K. and are using a tablet computer.

Now if you’re an affiliate marketer who is engaged in direct linking (linking to advertiser’s landing pages from search marketing campaigns) then you can save money and improve your conversion rate by tweaking your pay-per-click campaigns so that you get the maximum return on your investment.

[Read more…]

Why You Should Advertise On Microsoft adCenter And Not On Google AdWords

Google vs Bing

Google vs Bing

I’m pretty sure that If someone ask you to name two search engines, it’s more likely that you mention Google and then maybe Bing.

My default search engine on all the three web browsers – Internet Explorer 9, Google Chrome & Mozilla Firefox – is Google and will be Google itself unless Bing offers me all the advanced search features of Google. Bing does offer an advance search function but only with limited options.

However as an Internet Marketer when it comes to marketing I use Bing and only Bing. Simply because it offers better Return On Investment (ROI). Bing’s conversions are CRAZY as it sends you laser targeted visitors.

[Read more…]